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Put Me In Coach: Lance Armstrong a victim of his own success

August 30, 2012

For as long as many of us can remember, Lance Armstrong has dedicated his mind, body and soul to the sport of cycling and not much else.
His Livestrong Foundation, which can be advertised in pretty much every way imaginable has raised over $400 million dollars toward cancer research since its innagural year of 1997.
In the wake of another set of steriod accusations, Armstrong has decided not to fight it any longer
He has been banned from the sport that has literally been his life. Armstrong has also been stripped of his seven Tour De France titles.
One of my former colleagues at Iowa State wrote an editorial in the campus newspaper today that posed the question of villan or victim?
The answer may not seem obvious at first, but if you sit down and think, the answer is clearly a victim.
Here is a man that beat the disease that kills around 1,500 people per day.
The battles he’s had to fight on a daily basis put our everyday struggles to shame.
Going through all the cancer treatments and doing so on a worldwide public scale had to add to his stress level ten fold.
When the news broke, this is what Lance Armstrong told ESPN- “I have been dealing with claims that I have cheated and had an unfair advantage winning my seven tours since 1999. The toll this has taken on my family and on my work for our foundation and on me leads me to where I am today- finished with this nonsense.”
In a way it’s hard to blame the guy for not wanting to fight any longer. If someone or a group of people have been blaming and accusing you for something that is so against what he seems to believe in, the body and mind could only take so much.
That’s one reason I believe he stopped fighting. He was tired and exhausted and the sport he loved was starting to become a sport he hated and loathed.
Why continue if the sport is going to be surrounded by people like the ones he has had to deal with since winning the first yellow top?
More importantly, I think he stopped fighting because he had faith in his fans and supporters.
He believed in the people that stuck by him the most when the times got hard.
Armstrong didn’t have anything left to prove to these people.
He chose to quit fighting to show faith in the common man that we can decide for themselves.
Armstrong showed faith in us. I feel its only right to have faith in him in return, the victim that he is.

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